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Wood in the tent?

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  • Toker1
    commented on 's reply
    If you don’t see any mold, then there isn’t a risk in harvesting in 2-3 weeks. This stuff takes time to develop. Unless you are actually seeing it, I wouldn’t worry about this harvest. It would be future harvests that I would be more concerned
    with.
    Just make sure to dry and cure the final product of this harvest properly to avoid mold.

  • dropinbiking
    commented on 's reply
    I had no issues, just figured harvesting would be better than risking it all going moldy. They were only 2-3 weeks from being done, not a huge loss. Big lesson learned for next time. I shouldn't have grown in the closet to begin with.

  • Toker1
    commented on 's reply
    If you are currently seeing problems, I could see pulling the plug early on your girls. If it’s WPM, I have heard of people still harvesting WPM buds and they do a complete bud wash with hydrogen peroxide (I believe) prior to drying. There are videos on you tube on how that can be done. I, personally, have never tried it myself. I can’t speak to how well it works. Definitely would not attempt this if I were a medical/recreational grower.
    If there are no signs of mold, then you most likely don’t have it. In that case, I would just plan out the new seeds and tent for the next grow. Best of luck!

  • dropinbiking
    replied
    Well that sucked, early harvest is better than no harvest, still feel shitty about it but I think it was the right choice. I'll wait until I get my tent before I sprout any more seeds. Honestly this might be a good thing I realized this because now I can order proper seeds and start from scratch. Feels shitty to pull the plug so early but better safe than sorry I guess.

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  • Toker1
    replied
    dropinbiking i don’t mean to cause any unnecessary concern, you can usually see and smell these types of issues before they become a real problem. If there is lots of mold already growing somewhere near your grow room, than yes I would consider that to be high risk.
    The point I was trying to make is in general wood in the garden is no bueno my friend. Let’s not forget that commercial and medical growers frequent these sites here as well. So the conversations we are having must apply to the masses and not just to the individuals contributing to the topic.

    Leave a comment:


  • Toker1
    commented on 's reply
    IMHO, An ounce of prevention is worth its weight in gold.
    My room is built from a pressure treated wood frame, with mold resistant foam board insulation, and mold resistant sheet rock coated in mold resistant paint. The flooring is concrete which I scrub after every harvest. It’s sealed from pests. Inside that room I have several tents which house my plants. This was very easy to construct with 2 people working.

  • dropinbiking
    commented on 's reply
    Kinda, I'm just really high right now wondering about all these things that might kill me. Tokers got me on a paranoia train.

  • JDU
    replied
    🍻. Thank you all for your replies. Seems there are 2 camps here- those who use it & have had no problems & those who can foresee a potential problem & choose not to risk it. Nothing wrong with either stance. Hell- I germinate my seeds, plant my clones & transplant a plant WAY differently than most of ya lol. & as long as we all get to the harvest theres nothin wrong with either method 🤠

    Leave a comment:


  • Toker1
    commented on 's reply
    No, I would just keep the paint coating in good condition and it shouldn’t cause an issue. If you are worried, do a daily coating inspection. Re-coat with fresh mold resistant paint if you visually see any damage or flaking of the coating.

  • dropinbiking
    replied
    Hopefully I don't die :\ Should I scrap my whole closet and start over? Is the risk that bad?

    Leave a comment:


  • Toker1
    replied
    Call me over cautious if you like, but I used to grow for a medical collective. One of my patients had a compromised immune system. Any mold spores in the room or on the final product could potentially cause death for this particular individual. So I take that type of issue very seriously. If you are just growing for yourself and you are not getting sick due to spore exposure, then it’s probably of no concern to you. I get that. I don't think it’s ok for medicinal or commercial purposes. There needs to be better quality controls established in the garden for consumer safety purposes. Anything you do with wood in the grow room could be done with a superior food grade quality material. Sure it costs a bit more, but getting someone sick or worse could potentially cause that business to be in a financial ruin. Not to mention that you would have to live with these types decisions made for the remainder of your life. Once again, no thanks! The cost to risk/benefits are just not supporting allowing wood in my garden.
    Last edited by Toker1; 01-18-2020, 09:07 PM.

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  • SoOrbudgal
    commented on 's reply
    That's awesome fellas.

  • Toker1
    commented on 's reply
    It’s garnet dust you are thinking about. Not saw dust.
    https://www.planetnatural.com/produc...-potting-soil/
    Plus, you are not reusing the soil, right? So, not exactly what we all have been discussing here.
    WPM needs to have spores in your grow room to expose your plants. No matter which type of medium you are using.
    Outdoor soil is not really comparable to indoor soil because in the outdoors for every pest the plant may encounter, there is another out there able and willing to consume it. Definitely not the case with indoor soil.
    Let’s be realistic, most soil comes packed with healthy bacteria, so any unhealthy bacteria would need to consume the healthy type first before it becomes an issue.
    My grow room drywall is mold resistant, so no... that’s not the case when you plan properly. Even if yours is not, you can still coat with mold resistant coating.
    Treated wood, pressurized wood, stained wood, and coated wood is ok. But we are not talking about hanging butcher blocks up in the grow room, unless I missed something there.
    I never said all wood has bacteria or mold...I just said anything that has a chance to collect mold or bacteria has no place in a grow room.
    It’s no wonder why mold testing on final product has become so prevalent in the commercial industry reading some of these responses.

  • BaccaRacca
    commented on 's reply
    Just to be clear, the primary ingredient in what appears to be the most popular planting mix used on this forum, Fox Farm, is saw dust. The saw dust is treated with nitrogen to feed bacteria that turns the saw dust into compost. I do believe that the increase in WPM that Nebulae Haze has written about is due to use of this mix, though. We should also remember farm soil, like that in Salinas, CA generated enough e. coli to poison over 40 people. A food service worker who fails to wash their hands poses a greater danger from the bacteria listed in the paper, than introducing wood into a growing environment. Many people grow in rooms built with drywall construction. Drywall comes with mold baked in -- just waiting for the right conditions to grow. It will mold before wood. The butcher block I cut up this evening's salad upon? Wood. It hasn't killed me. I have not seen any mold on my wood growing cabinets. My first prototype cabinet has been in service for almost a year and it shows no mold. Where I will see mold on wood in my basement reflects what I see from other posters -- where high humidity and poor air circulation are present.

  • JDU
    commented on 's reply
    Sweet!! I will def PM ya when I know when!!

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