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Why is Fox Farm soil SOOO Acidic??

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  • No3odiesShad0w
    replied
    Update!
    So .... First thing still having pH issues (Fox Farm soil) with the one on the right. Even though it's showing stress, it's growing taller faster and bushier than the one on the left. Curious why the one showing stress is growing faster?

    The 2 seedlings in the Espoma soil both look equally healthy. I regret not adding perlite to the soil but i really wanted to test the soil straight out of the bag, unadulterated. No pH issues. The seedlings look nice and healthy and they look like they have rooted since the leaf growth has increased. They should rapidly increase in size over the next 5 days.

    All the plants are getting 20 hours light. Water pH 6.5 -6.7
    Autoflower Northern Lights

    Leave a comment:


  • No3odiesShad0w
    commented on 's reply
    I read that autos don't mind poor soils. That's also why any auto flower soil blends always have about half the nutes compared to the normal recipe. It will grow and do it's thing but i think the end result might not be as potent as one that has at least some nutes. .... But i could be wrong

  • No3odiesShad0w
    commented on 's reply
    RetiredGuy a week written response lol 👍. I was curious and looked at the Amazon reviews and same thing. Too Acidic. Seems like many ppl are having the same issue.
    I've been hearing good things about Roots Organic and Espoma organic.

  • RetiredGuy
    commented on 's reply
    Here is how I answered fox farms:

    Thanks for the quick cut and paste answer, but as a retired Chemical Engineer I don’t buy it!

    1. If the runoff is coming out low pH and what is going in is higher, than there is too much acid in the soil.

    2. If the oyster shells were adjusting the pH properly, the run off would not be low.

    3. If the soil pH is right, I would not be seeing Phosphorus deficiencies.

    Guess I will try Stonington blend next time, I have read great reviews.

    BTW, I have read on various forums, that others have had the same issue with your soil.

  • 3Berries
    commented on 's reply
    The perlite is like diluting the soil, adding inert mass.

  • 3Berries
    replied
    Helps to use hard well water and add perlite. But I've gone to ProMix BX. It has hardly no nutes. Haven't finished a grow with it yet other than my first experimental auto, which is how I found out it has little to no nutes.

    Leave a comment:


  • No3odiesShad0w
    commented on 's reply
    That's such a safe company answer, it was painful to read. Lolol. "Our product isn't bad you just suck doing what you do"...... Or maybe your product isn't good and/or not stable. Maybe it is pH'd but by the time you get it the pH changed because of crap quality ingredients.

    But okay less pretend the calibration on there pen is bad..... How do you explain the orange pH test drops? I don't think those need calibration. If water is green, Espoma comes out green but fox farm is orange/red-orange, how do they explain that? The cabbage leaf test might even work the damn soil is so acidic.

    If the pH is of use dolomite lime.... So i guess it's not "ready to use" lolol. Maybe they were good back in the day and now they're just riding on that as long as they can before they have to actually fix something.

  • No3odiesShad0w
    commented on 's reply
    You know me always experimenting and testing stuff. I didn't add anything just used the soil as is from the bag. Just curious to see how they stack up but i think the espoma could use some perlite while the fox farm is loaded with perlite but that wouldn't be causing the acidity.

  • RetiredGuy
    replied
    I’ve had the same problems as the original poster with fox farm soils and will not be using again either. To make matters worse, I found their response to my question about low pH to be ridiculous:

    Thank you for contacting FoxFarm, I would be happy to help!



    Receiving an accurate picture of the pH of soil can be very difficult. We do not recommend testing the soil pH by testing runoff or placing the probe directly into the soil. The pH buffers in our soils, such as oyster shell, will not register on your pH meter if you are testing the runoff or if you just place your pH meter in the soil. The oyster shell works as a pH adjustor once it comes in contact with water.



    All FoxFarm soils come pH adjusted right out of the bag between 6.3 and 6.8, which is the ideal range for plant nutrient availability. In order to ensure that your soil pH remains in the proper range, we recommend that you adjust the pH of your nutrient solution between 6.3 and 6.8, alternate feedings and waterings, and periodically flush your soil of excess salts.



    Make sure that you have a relatively new pH meter that is clean and calibrated according the manual instructions. If you are testing for soil pH, we recommend that you perform a soil slurry test, as described below. This ensures that all of the pH adjustors within the soil work properly and register on your pH meter. It is important to note that the used soil may have a different pH than the new soil from the bag due to the pH of the irrigation water.



    How to Perform an At-Home Soil Slurry Test to Determine Soil pH



    Some gardeners like to be able to check the pH of their soil. Since actual soil pH can be difficult to determine without expensive lab equipment, we recommend a slurry test to determine the pH of your soil. Soil slurries provide a pH of the slurry, not the soil, and is used as an indicator of the soil pH. The soil slurry pH will be more acidic than the actual soil pH, which is to be expected. We recommend two slurries:



    • A 1:1 slurry – mix 1 part soil to 1 part distilled water (by volume)

    • A 1:5 slurry - mix 1 part soil to 5 parts distilled water (by volume)

    • Thoroughly mix these slurries and allow them to sit for about 15 minutes

    • Next, check the pH of the slurry with litmus paper, liquid indicator dye, or a digital pH meter

    • The 1:1 slurry of Happy Frog Potting Soilshould have a pH of 5.0-6.3

    • The 1:5 slurry of Happy Frog Potting Soilshould have a pH of 5.6-6.6

    • The 1:1 slurry of Ocean Forest Potting Soil should have a pH of 5.0-6.2

    • The 1:5 slurry of Ocean Forest Potting Soilshould have a pH of 5.6-6.7

    • If pH values of the slurries are in the ranges provided above, you can assume that the pH of your soil is in the 6.3-6.8 range



    * These pH ranges are based off our testing, which is done with tap water. Your municipal tap water may be different from ours, so your pH may be different as well.



    If your soil pH is not within the correct range according to the soil slurry then you may want to adjust your soil. Dolomitic limestone will raise your pH and soil sulfur can lower the pH. Be sure to follow the manufacturer’s directions and water thoroughly after adding a pH adjustor so that it will be activated. If your pH is outside of the ideal range, your plants will not be able to take up nutrients and you will want to wait to fertilize the soil until the adjustor has taken effect. This can take up to 30 days. However, you can supplement with foliar fertilizers during that time regardless of the soil pH.



    If you have any other questions please do not hesitate to contact us. To learn more about our company, new products, and download our latest feeding schedules please visitwww.FoxFarm.com.



    Caelidh

    Product Support Specialist

    FoxFarm Soil & Fertilizer Company
    Last edited by RetiredGuy; 09-29-2022, 10:04 AM.

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  • 3Berries
    commented on 's reply
    @90Gizmo
    Distilled, RO or even rain water are very hard to get reliable pH numbers from. How reliable they are would be questionable. You should not store the pH probe in any of them either. It does not take much to change the pH of them at all.

    As far as calibration, if the range you are usually testing is 6.0-8.0, then the 7.0 point is all that is needed to calibrate for.

    There have been questions too about how long the calibration fluids are good for. Some mix from powders, I use the bottled General Hydroponics GH1552 PH 7 brand. Buy it by the quart. Last one was in January of 21 and I just got a new bottle yesterday. I calibrated with the last of the old and then read the new, then vise versa. The Apera ph20 read both the same. I expected that as General Hydroponics doesn't mention a shelf life of has a date on the bottle.

  • SoOrbudgal
    commented on 's reply
    But also look at the perilite huge difference too. I like espoma mix i've used it mixed with worm casing an coco coir when i've done a large amount of containers.

  • 90Gizmo
    commented on 's reply
    Someone told me during my first grow that distilled water isn't a valid calibration (because there's "nothing" to calibrate against) and that you have to use a calibrated non-seven-pH solution for accuracy. My meter calls for two calibrations for very low pH measurements.

  • LemonBud
    replied
    Someone argued and swore by that ff ocean forest or there brands dont burn sprouts so maybe its watering light source . Good Luck

    Leave a comment:


  • 3Berries
    replied
    I just started two Bubba Kush autos on FF OF. I added a quart of perlite and some limestone type material to 3.5 gallons. Going to be fun keeping up with them and now I'm going into high CO 2 season to with the heat on...

    Just finished a OF and another on HF with GranDaddy Purple. It was a struggle but good buds and nice smells.

    Leave a comment:


  • No3odiesShad0w
    commented on 's reply
    Lol yeah i have pH drops and it's positively orange when i put them in. It's def way too acidic

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