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Outdoor lighting affecting flowering transition?

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    Outdoor lighting affecting flowering transition?

    Is it possible that my backyard lighting is impacting my plant’s flowing stage? I have two gals growing outdoors since June 1. Plants look great! However they are not budding yet at all. I am in the northern Midwest and the days are certainly shorter. A thought came to mind: maybe my outdoor lighting (scheduled to turn on at dusk and off at midnight) is impacting flowering transition?

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    Starts
    08-30-2023
    Ends
    08-30-2023

    #2
    If your asking now it probably is cause most are already in bloom. Why put up that calendar nobody cares about that, and why would you put your plants under a large outdoor light? You started way late for photoperiod outdoors they are gonna be late bloomers. I wish you luck but i'm doubtful on you getting much of a harvest.....timing is everything growing photos outdoors.

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    • Bluey
      Bluey commented
      Editing a comment
      This is spot on, as long as the seasons/weather stay the same every year, which is becoming more unpredictable with greater extremes and its stuffing up outdoor grows all over the shop. The planet is changing.

      Successful outdoor grows I believe will be fewer and fewer thanks to climate change. It will eventually not be viable to grow outside without a greenhouse or similar.

    #3
    From what I have seen if you can read by the (night) light its to much. I too have a plant that is not yet in bloom, started in April next to another that has already finished.

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      #4
      Apologies for the calendar - I must have accidentally enabled it and can't erase it now; clearly it is meaningless. Maybe I should have clarified: There is no "large outdoor light". Simple a string of bulb along my fence to keep raccoons from driving my dogs nuts.

      I'm honestly just trying to learn. I assume that light is the most important factor for flower production. Otherwise strategies like 12/12 from seed would not work. In a controlled environment, you can keep a plant in veg indefinitely by controlling light. Indeed, though the weather/climate is changing quite rapidly, the amount of sunlight per day for a given year will only change slightly each year (given planetary motion). If these things are true than, why would outdoor flowering depend on whenen the plant is germinated? Clearly, there are so many variables when growing outdoors, but it is an interesting question considering how pervasive light pollution is becoming.

      mahalo

      Comment


      • Bluey
        Bluey commented
        Editing a comment
        Planting here on the correct weekend has always been pivotal to a successful grow.

        Even planting them early or late by a few weeks makes a difference with weather. eg., frosts, heat, rain, and what us also critical is when the plant flips from veg to flower which is critical for a successful crop.

        Planting more than 4 weeks either side of ideal often results in failed crops outdoors.

      • SoOrbudgal
        SoOrbudgal commented
        Editing a comment
        I only know about growing outdoors from doing it for decades. I've learned my lessons and learned about strains. This could be a disscussion and a long one but i don't talk an teach about it as much anymore. Think about what the production growers do indoors with plants. They blast them with nutes an lights till there 6wks old then flip. But it's so controlled that it can be done. No light leaks, perfect temps. strong lights.
        I've learned in my area that i have to start indoors in April under lights for photoperiod in order to get the plants strong/healthy enough to go outdoors without controls. And know about the sunrise/sunset lengths. It's how the light deprivation became neccessary for outdoor growers with shorter seasons.

      #5
      If we're still talking about your original question the answer is it depends. It depends on the spectrum of light the plants are exposed to at night. Moonlight won't bother them of course. Same thing with street lamps. Incandescent or LED lights might be a problem depending on how close they are to the plants. It's the spectrum of light that the plants respond to.
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